Dunadd

Dunadd

The coronation place for the first Kings of Scotland

Dunadd is in Argyllshire, near Kilmichael Glassary on the West side of Scotland. High atop a hill, overlooking the lush fields and water is the place, according to tradition, where the first Kings of Scotland were coronated. About AD500, Fergus Mor, son of Erc, place his foot in the stone and faced north toward Cruachan. He became the first king of the land called Alba, and this area became known as the Albain Dalriada. This spot would remain the coronation stone until AD845 when Kenneth MacAlpin move the High King's Seat to Scone. There another stone was used for the coronation, and until a few years ago had been kept in Britain.

Fergus was the first king, and along with his (supposed) brothers Lorne in Lorn and Angus from Juray and Islay, were the first leaders of Scotland. Somerled is said to have come from Angus stock, and would later be the start of Clan Donald and the Lord of the Isles. Much MacInnes history is woven through these lands and tales from the start of Angus (Aonghais = Innes, Mac = sons of or family of, MacInnes).

The rock depression and a Pictish picture of a boar are all that remain, along with some of the fort ruins. Until recently the site was open to the public and the elements, I understand there is now a glass box to protect the foot and other sensitive artifacts from the elements.

References: Williams, Ronald. The Lord of the Isles. ISBN 1 899863 17 6 House of Lochar. 1997

 

Pictures of Dunadd Fort



The Dunadd ruins, looking to the East. The top is where the fort was located.



The stone in the parking at the base of Dunadd.

The Coronation Stone (far by the person) and a hole carved in the rock.

The indentation where the future King's foot must fit.

A hole carved out of the nearby rock. This was surely for the ritual, but its use is unknown.

If you look carefully you will see the outline of a pig on the side of the coronation rock.

Looking to the North West from the Coronation Stone.

Close up of the foot indentation.

The fort marker up on the hill.


The view to the south west.


A part of a wall on the top.

Another wall further down on the hill.

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